orgtheory.net

acceptance rates in perspective

If you just got an article rejected from a journal and are depressed by journal acceptance rates in the social sciences (e.g., good “organizational” journals have a 5-10% acceptance rate, or so), then you might comfort yourself by looking at the acceptance rates of literary outlets, whether magazines or journals.

Duotrope Digest has a nice database (though, only with user-provided info) and it essentially confirms that there is a less than 1% acceptance rate for top outlets publishing fiction or poetry (for example, in The New Yorker, Atlantic, Poetry Magazine, Kenyon Review, Ploughshares).   Britain’s top poetry outlet, Poetry Review, advertises that they get 60,000 submissions a year and publish 120 of them.

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Written by teppo

August 25, 2010 at 7:45 pm

5 Responses

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  1. you’ve gotten me very pessimistic that “”Tapping a Maple on a Cold Vermont Morning” will ever see print

    also, there’s a great section in Economy of Prestige about occasions when competitions, especially poetry competitions, reject all the submissions and refuse to award/publish anything at all. this usually inspires no small conflict between the press sponsoring the competition and the judge.

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    gabrielrossman

    August 25, 2010 at 11:03 pm

  2. Gabriel: Please send me a copy of “Tapping” —– we’d be thrilled to publish it here at orgtheory (just based on the title).

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    teppofelin

    August 25, 2010 at 11:33 pm

  3. there’s a great section in Economy of Prestige about occasions when competitions, especially poetry competitions, reject all the submissions and refuse to award/publish anything at all.

    ASQ should really try this as an April Fool’s joke – “We have decided not to publish an issue this quarter because none of the submissions met our reviewers’ high standards.”

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    brayden king

    August 25, 2010 at 11:35 pm

  4. Sorry, clearly I missed the Cosgrove reference.

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    teppofelin

    August 28, 2010 at 12:37 am

  5. no problem, missing things associated with Cosgrove (such as his riding mower) isn’t necessarily a bad idea

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    gabrielrossman

    August 29, 2010 at 1:01 am


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