orgtheory.net

cool social science books of 2008?

Here are the books we’ve covered this year:

Post your own nominations for great recent social science writing – or not so recent! Authors, don’t hesitate to plug your own stuff.

Written by fabiorojas

September 16, 2008 at 5:58 pm

Posted in books, fabio

15 Responses

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  1. Jerry Davis and Dick Scott are listed as authors for Organizations and Organizing. Just to give credit…

    Great list to start browsing.

    Like

    Jordi

    September 16, 2008 at 8:32 pm

  2. The Averaged American: Surveys, Citizens, and the Making of a Mass Public by Sarah Igo.

    Like

    shakha

    September 16, 2008 at 10:13 pm

  3. Jessica Fields, Risky Lessons: Sex Education and Social Inequality. Rutgers U Press.

    and

    Adina Nack, Damaged Goods: Women Living with Incurable Sexually Transmitted Disease. Temple U Press.

    Both are fascinating, topical and really well written.

    Like

    tina

    September 16, 2008 at 10:30 pm

  4. Ima double down on Sarah Igo.

    Like

    Jenn Lena

    September 16, 2008 at 11:17 pm

  5. Tine – I did an ASA panel a few years back with Adina and her work was fascinating. So happy to see it come out in book form!

    Like

    fabiorojas

    September 17, 2008 at 12:48 am

  6. I add to Jenn and Shakha on Igo’s book – terrific!

    Also: Danielle S. Allen, Talking to Strangers; David Jeneman, Adorno in America; Markus Prior, Post-Broadcast Democracy. And, in the article department, a charming little example of what I’ve been thinking about as the “paradox of reform”: Jo Reger, “Talking about My Vagina: Two College Campuses and The Vagina Monologues“, pp. 139-160 in Reger, Jo, ed., Different Wavelengths: Studies of the Contemporary Women’s Movement.

    Like

    andrewperrin

    September 17, 2008 at 12:53 am

  7. The Christopher Alexander book, Notes on the Synthesis of Form, is a great choice (and always worth a plug), though it is from 1964 (didn’t check, perhaps there is a new 2008 printing).

    Like

    tf

    September 17, 2008 at 1:07 am

  8. Feel free to delete this comment, but who is Christopher Scott? Christopher Alexander wrote Notes on the Synthesis of Form.

    Like

    stickler

    September 17, 2008 at 2:57 am

  9. Also, what about Gelman’s book, Red State, Blue State, Rich State, Poor State? I haven’t read it. But I want to.

    Like

    shakha

    September 17, 2008 at 2:59 am

  10. Stickler – post corrected!

    Like

    fabiorojas

    September 17, 2008 at 3:10 am

  11. I’m with everyone on Igo, and also Gelman’s Red State, Blue State.
    In a similar vein, I have read some shortened essay versions of Larry Bartels’ Unequal Democracy, which looks excellent.

    Like

    Dan Hirschman

    September 17, 2008 at 12:18 pm

  12. I have to throw in “a secular age’ by charles taylor… though it stands perhaps a bit more in line with philosophy and not data driven social science.

    Like

    peter boumgarden

    September 17, 2008 at 12:51 pm

  13. What is teh paradox of reform, andrew?

    Like

    Jordi

    September 17, 2008 at 3:30 pm

  14. Jordi: The paradox of reform is a name I’ve given to the general set of claims in social theory that social reforms aimed at “opening” society or reducing social control often produce increased social control in other areas. I hope to write about it more formally at some point, although I mentioned the concept here. I have found examples in specific empirical literatures, particularly in criminology, and also of course in a wide variety of social theory including Weber, Foucault, Coser, Goffman.

    Like

    andrewperrin

    September 17, 2008 at 3:39 pm

  15. That is very interesting. It seems there is a parallel mechanism or process with information technologies, perhaps? Info technologies that can provide greater granularity, transparency, or accountability, can also become the means for expansion of organizational or government control. The technologies that enable open source and a hacker culture (Pekka Hinamen’s term) also enable the surveillance society.

    Like

    Jordi

    September 20, 2008 at 12:11 am


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