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orgtheorist makes good: kogut on the daily show

dailyshowthumbTry as I might, I have not been able to figure out how to embed this video: the Daily Show with Jon Stewart takes on the MBA oath and Bruce Kogut plays a staring role.

Having watched it, I am now considering getting some prominent arm tattoos… clearly they generate more respect from MBA students than my current sartorial efforts have achieved to date.

More importantly, kudos to Bruce for playing the straight man with aplomb.  I’d say he does the George Burns thing to John Oliver’s Gracie very well indeed.

Written by seansafford

August 14, 2009 at 3:37 pm

10 Responses

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  1. Awesome! Must find some way to work this into my class this quarter.

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    brayden

    August 14, 2009 at 5:24 pm

  2. So what kind of tie did Sean settle on? Ever try bow ties?

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    fabiorojas

    August 14, 2009 at 5:36 pm

  3. No, but I have taken to sewing leather patches at the elbow in order to retain some kind of sociological street cred. But I think the prison look works better.

    As for ties, the most recent was a very skinny, somewhat shiny blue with a dark stripe on the bias. No shirt needed to be purchased in the service of this tie.

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    Sean Safford

    August 14, 2009 at 5:38 pm

  4. Sounds like a winner. There are some days I wonder why we ever try anything other than skinny ties. They work with almost everything.

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    fabiorojas

    August 14, 2009 at 5:44 pm

  5. Very funny. But watching it in a country that has a somewhat kinder and gentler prison system (some might say we’re “soft on crime” over here), the most striking thing about this clip was the (I think) unnecessary joke/theme at the expense of the victims of prison rape. I have cultural prediction: that joke will soon move out of the spectrum of good taste (especially for a liberal-minded show like DS). It will be what gives this clip a very dated look in twenty years. A bit like the gay jokes of the 1980s. It’s “wrong on so many levels”, as one says, and I think that would make it hard for me to use it in a classroom.

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    Thomas Basbøll

    August 15, 2009 at 4:17 pm

  6. if you all forgive me for interrupting you, let me just say thanks, Sean, for the kind commentary on my major debut. leaving aside the challenge of not straying into dangerous waters during 2 hours of taping and making sure Columbia looks relatively good -turns out to be not too hard given what followed, what struck me were not only skinny ties and tatoos, though important, but how easily all the superficial and non-reflective MBA banter surfaced. to me, the conclusion was, there is a problem. you might want to look up the huffington post commentary on this. in all, john oliver is very funny and someone was kind: i am glad that they cut that other 95% out from the interview….

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    Bruce Kogut

    August 16, 2009 at 6:23 pm

  7. The eyebrow raise at 0:57 is subtle, but effective. Nicely done.

    I did kind of wonder how much of the students’ banter was scripted; its sounded alarmingly familiar…

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    Sean Safford

    August 17, 2009 at 8:50 am

  8. I don’t have any inside info on these “reports” and “interviews” but my sense is that they are made using a very simple technique. First, they have a relatively straight (and “unscripted”) discussion. Then they use the material as answer to questions they interlace after the fact (cutting back and forth to give the impression that a facial reaction is a reaction to a specific remark.) In that sense, it’s all fiction, just as I could make a funny dialogue by cut and pasting totally unrelated things from the blog that people actually said, except not in response to each other.

    The interview subjects are just being good sports. As Jon Stewart has made clear a number of times, this is not a news show. It’s a comedy show. The business-planning and the fight at the end is the obvious(ly scripted) “cards on the table”, “we’re just kidding” moment.

    It’s just sketch comedy. This show tells us nothing (new) about how business school students think. It dramatizes our prejudices about them. It makes fun of business schools. At a time like this, that’s Stewarts job.

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    Thomas Basbøll

    August 17, 2009 at 9:17 am

  9. i think that everyone would love to watch some comedy shows because it is very entertaining :,.

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    Arla Ghosten

    November 25, 2010 at 6:47 am

  10. […] orgtheory.net. … other posts by […]

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