orgtheory.net

calling hungry commenters: fête de la fédération!

Me: female comparative sociologist w/ seasonal laptop burns, likes fieldwork on the beach, fanny packs… Hi everyone and happy summer! As an avid reader of orgtheory with a raging case of manuscript-induced cabin fever, I love what the guys have created here and am thrilled to be blogging this July/August. My current research involves a few projects relevant to readers of this blog, so prepare yourselves for org brain picking about those and other things on my mind. I’m also mildly obsessed with the political cultures of commenter communities, so I hope in addition to sharing some of my summertime fixations to spark some serious and not so serious commenting.

Just to get things started and raise the stakes a bit with fabulous prizes: My brothers are in the mail order food business. This means that, in addition to having logged many hours shipping grits to Alaska, I happen to fancy culinary analogies. One of my favorites: “civil society is the ‘chicken soup’ of the social sciences” (Rosenblum and Post 2002:23). What other food analogies can you dream up for particular scholarly preoccupations? Include a brief explanation. A delicious can of boiled peanuts for the best entries posted in the comments, to be bestowed at ASA in Atlanta or by ground service to the AOM crowd. The perfect locavore complement to section reception cheese cubes!

Here’s mine, in honor of Bastille Day and the Marquis: If civil society is the chicken soup of the social sciences, then deliberative democracy is the cassoulet of political theory—a rich, messy stew of folk origins whose consumption often has more to do with patriotic experience than everyday sustenance. Bonus analogy for those facing the market this fall: C. Wright Mills has become the mayonnaise of teaching philosophy statements in sociology—a bland but obligatory condiment that’s best in small quantities.

Written by carolinewlee

July 14, 2010 at 11:22 pm

18 Responses

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  1. OrgTheory.net is the raw oyster bar of sociological blogging. A briny, sinewy, mixture of gooey goodness that’s good for your brain.

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    seansafford

    July 15, 2010 at 1:00 am

  2. w/ seasonal laptop burns

    lol.

    Middle Range Theory, the High Fructose Corn Syrup of introductory sections. Sweet, nice mouthfeel, cheap to add, and nutritionally worthless.

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    Kieran

    July 15, 2010 at 1:22 am

  3. Harrison C. White’s _Markets from Networks_ is a Sacher torte: dense, elegant, and too much for anyone to finish.

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    Randy

    July 15, 2010 at 2:00 am

  4. Juche is like your flatmate’s leftover Chinese. You’re warily intrigued, but in the end, you’re just eating somebody else’s rice.

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    casualfactors

    July 15, 2010 at 3:25 am

  5. […] food-based political puns Posted in posts by casualfactors on July 15, 2010 Orgtheory‘s guest blogger is giving away boiled peanuts for food analogies – a contest too good […]

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  6. Embeddedness is truffle oil — it was super hip a few years ago, now everyone clamors to make sure they include it in their recipes, even if they aren’t sure what it’s contributing or if the recipe would taste any different without it.

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    Trey

    July 15, 2010 at 3:01 pm

  7. Social movement theory is foie gras. It has an air of subversiveness that makes it appealing to the elites.

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    brayden

    July 15, 2010 at 3:25 pm

  8. Resource mobilization theory is the fruitcake of social movement studies. It is dry and generally distasteful but it keeps getting passed along year to year.

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    Omar

    July 15, 2010 at 3:49 pm

  9. Also, I love boiled peanuts.

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    Trey

    July 15, 2010 at 4:21 pm

  10. Social capital is chilaquiles, at first an exciting burst of flavor but after a few minutes it turns into a soggy mess.

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    gabrielrossman

    July 15, 2010 at 6:04 pm

  11. Network analysis is molecular gastronomy — not a food itself but rather a means of preparing food by means of complex gadgets, a large staff, substantial expense, and perhaps also high temperatures; the eventual output is something you already knew how to make.

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    Kieran

    July 15, 2010 at 6:55 pm

  12. Sociological rational choice theory is the raisin of the social sciences: a shriveled, deformed version of something that used to be much better, yet it keeps showing up where you least expect it.

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    Omar

    July 15, 2010 at 7:04 pm

  13. Cripes, I was preparing a molecular gastronomy one but it was going to be agent-based modeling instead of network analysis.

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    Trey

    July 15, 2010 at 7:48 pm

  14. Luhmanian systems theory is the GM strawberry of the social sciences: an autopoietic and indigestible super-mutant that’s agin’ nature, with pretensions to world domination.

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    Jonathan

    July 15, 2010 at 8:03 pm

  15. It works better with agent-based modeling, I think.

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    Kieran

    July 15, 2010 at 10:06 pm

  16. Omar: some of us really like raisins.

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    tf

    July 15, 2010 at 10:16 pm

  17. A sumptuous southern/french fusion feast worthy of Richard Blais. For appetizers, I am picturing oyster shooters and foiellipops with Coca-Cola reduction, followed by chilaquiles with raisin foam, and the grand finale– the sacher torte and fruitcake napoleon, with alternating layers of gm strawberry ice cream and truffle sorbet. Bon appetit!
    Of course, now I have to rework my entire intro syllabus, and my plans for unveiling my paradigm-shifting “embedded social capital” critique of Luhmann using agent-based modeling next month at ASA are pretty much ruined. Dang it. At least now we know that Omar’s scared of raisins.

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    carolinewlee

    July 16, 2010 at 4:33 am

  18. […] a comment » As Omar’s foodie comment suggests, many scholars see resource mobilization theory as one of those tried-and-true theoretical […]

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