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open borders… in the new york times?

An op-ed in the New York Times makes the case for open borders. From Debunking the Myth of the Job Stealing Immigrant by Adam Davidson:

… Few of us are calling for the thing that basic economic analysis shows would benefit nearly all of us: radically open borders.

And yet the economic benefits of immigration may be the ­most ­settled fact in economics. A recent University of Chicago poll of leading economists could not find a single one who rejected the proposition. (There is one notable economist who wasn’t polled: George Borjas of Harvard, who believes that his fellow economists underestimate the cost of immigration for low-­skilled natives. Borjas’s work is often misused by anti-immigration activists, in much the same way a complicated climate-­science result is often invoked as “proof” that global warming is a myth.) Rationally speaking, we should take in far more immigrants than we currently do.

Outstanding. I hope this spurs more discussion of open borders.

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Written by fabiorojas

March 26, 2015 at 12:01 am

One Response

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  1. The op-ed only neglected to mention a similar poll that suggested negative effects of immigration.

    From your quote of the article: “And yet the economic benefits of immigration may be the most­-settled fact in economics. A recent University of Chicago poll of leading economists could not find a single one who rejected the proposition.” However, that proposition appears to be about only the *aggregate* effect of *high-skilled* immigrants. See here: http://www.igmchicago.org/igm-economic-experts-panel/poll-results?SurveyID=SV_0JtSLKwzqNSfrAF.

    Adam Davidson did not mention the recent University of Chicago poll of leading economists in which 50% agreed or strongly agreed that “Unless they were compensated by others, many low-skilled American workers would be substantially worse off if a larger number of low-skilled foreign workers were legally allowed to enter the US each year.” See Question B here: http://www.igmchicago.org/igm-economic-experts-panel/poll-results?SurveyID=SV_5vuNnqkBeAMAfHv. Only 9% of the leading economists disagreed or strongly disagreed with that statement.

    I don’t see any reason to prefer one of those polls to the other, if the goal is to inform readers.

    Like

    L.J Zigerell

    March 26, 2015 at 4:26 pm


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