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once again, halloween is the best holiday

I’ve often argued that Halloween is clearly and obviously the best holiday. Let me restate the case:

  • Low social expectations. If you drop out and don’t do it, no one cares.
  • Low cost. Just buy a bag of candy and you’re ready to go. Cheap costumes (or none) total acceptable.
  • Be anything you want to be.
  • Cool colors.
  • No one alienates their family over “Halloween Dinner.”
  • Limited travel.
  • Pro-child holiday.
  • A-political and inclusive of all religious and secular people.

I wish we could have Halloween every day of the year.

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Written by fabiorojas

November 1, 2016 at 12:28 am

8 Responses

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  1. Well, I was with you until the last point–Halloween actually does have deep roots in specific Christian religious practices. Because of these roots, a variety of people of various faiths do not see engaging in Halloween as a religiously-acceptable behavior. Many Orthodox Jews and Muslims do not participate, and a number of conservative Protestant denominations see the holiday as an immoral Satanic ritual.

    In order for a holiday to actually be areligious, it needs to have no discernible roots in the religious beliefs and traditions of any faith. Halloween is not that holiday.

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    Mikaila

    November 1, 2016 at 2:01 am

  2. I respectfully disagree. As a Weberian, it is easy for me to see how Halloween has transitioned from religious to secular. Iron Cage Candy.

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    fabiorojas

    November 1, 2016 at 2:03 am

  3. Respectfully, it is an empirical matter that many religiously-practicing world fails to share your assessment. People with religious are the best judge of their own religious beliefs, and a practice does not become secular just because secular people do it. I understand that you, and most other people observing Halloween tonight, are doing so in a totally secular spirit, and that the holiday has become secularized. But that is not the same as saying that it is “inclusive of all religious and secular people” when it is demonstrably, empirically, not.

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    Mikaila

    November 1, 2016 at 2:11 am

  4. My claim is not that *everyone* sees that Halloween as secular. Rather, it is that most people who practice Halloween do so in a secular way. If some subgroup practices religious Halloween (Wiccans?) or views a secular practice from a religious point of view, that is beside the point. My only claim is that what most people do on Halloween is open to everyone – when most kids dress up as skeletons or stormtroopers, they don’t do it as a religious statement and everyone is free to accept or ignore as they see fit. There seems to be almost no social sanction for not believing in Halloween.

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    fabiorojas

    November 1, 2016 at 2:20 am

  5. OR: If group X really believes that dressing up as a ghost is an insult to dead spirits, you can dress up as something else that doesn’t go against X and most people will be cool with it.

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    fabiorojas

    November 1, 2016 at 2:30 am

  6. If you limit the argument to “most people,” that would work. But just because “most people” practice the holiday in a secular way it doesn’t mean the holiday is open to religious people of all backgrounds, some of whom are not able to participate regardless of what they dress up as.

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    Mikaila

    November 1, 2016 at 2:34 am

  7. Or think of the argument in this way: Halloween is the Unitarianism of holidays. You can do anything and be anything. There is no sanction for participating or not participating. You can modify it in just about anyway you want. Sure, maybe some religions would be against costumes for kids or candy, but not most people. Compared to other holidays, it is insanely wide and inclusive.

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    fabiorojas

    November 1, 2016 at 2:40 am

  8. “Be anything you want to be.” LOL. Obviously you haven’t been near a US university campus lately.

    Like

    Peter G. Klein

    November 1, 2016 at 3:56 am


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