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book forum: the conversational firm by catherine turco, part 3

A few weeks ago, I reviewed Catherine Turco’s The Conversational Firm. The book reports on field work conducted at a tech firm and the goal was to understand how social media was reshaping the internal structure of the firm. As I said before, it is a good book that is of strong interest to organizational ethnographers.

Here, I want to focus on one issue that bugged me about the book. Throughout the book, social media is treated as this interesting thing that allows communication to be less hierarchical and thus (possibly) nudge the firm in more democratic directions. What bugged me about this account is that Turco, I think, never considers an alternative explanation for why managers are democratizing things – laziness.

One of the things that you appreciate about firms is that entrepreneurs often lack the skills needed to run larger, more mature organizations. When firms are small, the entrepreneur is the person who brings endless energy and can jump in to many roles. This is simply not possible in larger firms. Successful entrepreneurs either exit the firm to focus on the world of start ups, or they must learn the art of delegating and managing people.

Social media and the egalitarian culture of modern firms allows entrepreneurs to avoid or postpone this difficult process. They don’t have to go through the process of establishing lines of authority and command, which is painful and results in hurt feelings. Social media may be less a tool for democratizing things and more of a way for firm leaders to postpone or avoid difficult personnel issues. It’s an important hypothesis that needs more attention.

So overall, good book. Strongly recommended to internet and society scholars and orgheads everywhere.

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Written by fabiorojas

April 10, 2017 at 1:57 am

2 Responses

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  1. Reblogged this on Gestión y Estudios Organizacionales and commented:
    This is very interesting in terms of how does social media affect authority and command. I think that I really would like to read Catherine Turco’s The Conversational Firm!

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  2. Thanks for the comment. It is a wonderful book to read and I had many interesting questions (like the one above). I hope it will spur more discussion about how social media impacts the business world.

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    fabiorojas

    April 11, 2017 at 1:49 am


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