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sociology’s greatest hits 2010-2019: #3 – the disintegration of institutional theory

It used to be that institutionalism was a theory that told you about how organizations are constrained. Now, it’s like all over the place. We got movements and institutions, race and institutions, institutional work, institutional entrepreneurship, inhabited institutionalism, fractured institutions, and more. It might be argued that this is normal – rather than a theory with very specific predictions, institutionalism is simply the name we give to the study of how organizations are/are not regulated by the environment. If so, the institutionalism has simply fallen apart. Whatever is happening, it probably deserves some serious theoretical attention.

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Written by fabiorojas

December 18, 2019 at 12:20 am

Posted in uncategorized

3 Responses

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  1. Very nice series of posts; it’s not so often that you see people taking stock over longer periods of time, and I think it’s very useful. Still, so far this has been mostly the greatest hits of *American* sociology…

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    Rense

    December 18, 2019 at 11:56 am

  2. Rense: Feel free to add your own! I’d love to hear what is happening beyond my purview.

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    fabiorojas

    December 19, 2019 at 3:22 pm

  3. I was afraid you’d ask that ;-). I can’t claim to have a sufficient overview over the discipline; it was more meant as an observation. But if I would have to mention one thing that, at least from a European perspective, I had expected to see in the list, it’s the rise of social network analysis as a mainstream paradigm, even outside the discipline.

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    Rense

    December 20, 2019 at 9:51 am


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