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credit where credit is due: gender and authorship conventions in economics and sociology

[Ha — I wrote this last night and set it to post for this morning — when I woke up saw that Fabio had beat me to it. Posting anyway for the limited additional thoughts it contains.]

Last week Fabio launched a heated discussion about whether economics is less “racially balanced” than other social sciences. Then on Friday Justin Wolfers (who has been a vocal advocate for women in economics) published an Upshot piece arguing that female economists get less credit when they collaborate with men.

The Wolfers piece covers research by Harvard economics PhD candidate Heather Sarsons, who used data on tenure decisions at top-30 economics programs in the last forty years to estimate the effects of collaboration (with men or women) on whether women get tenure, controlling for publication quantity and quality and so on. (Full paper here.) Only 52% of the women in this population received tenure, compared to 77% of the men.

The takeaway is that women got no marginal benefit (in terms of tenure decision) from coauthoring with men, while they received some benefit (but less than men did) if they coauthored with at least one other women. Their tenure chances did, however, benefit as much as men’s from solo-authored papers. Sarsons’ interpretation (after ruling out several alternative possibilities) is that while women are given full credit when there is no question about their role in a study, their contributions are discounted when they coauthor with men.

Interesting from a sociologist’s perspective is that Sarsons uses a more limited data set from sociology as a comparison. Looking at a sample of 250 sociology faculty at top-20 programs, she finds no difference in tenure rates by gender, and no similar disadvantage from coauthorship.

While it would be nice to interpret this as evidence of the great enlightenment of sociology around gender issues, that is probably premature. Nevertheless, Sarsons points to one key difference between sociology and economics (other than differing assumptions about women’s contributions) that could potentially explain the divergence.

Sociology, as most of you probably know, has a convention of putting the author who made the largest contribution first in the authorship list. Economics uses alphabetical order. Other disciplines have their own conventions — lab sciences, for example, put the senior author last. This means that sociologists can infer a little bit more than economists about who played the biggest role in a paper from authorship order — information Sarsons suggests might contribute to women receiving more credit for their collaborative work.

This sounds plausible to me, although I also wouldn’t be surprised if the two disciplines made different assumptions, ceteris paribus, about women’s contributions. It might be worth looking at sociology articles with the relatively common footnote “Authors contributed equally; names are listed in alphabetical order” (or reverse alphabetical order, or by coin toss, or whatever). Of course such a note still provides information about relative contribution — 50-50, at least in theory — so it’s not an ideal comparison. But I would bet that readers mentally give one author more credit than the other for these papers.

That may just be the first author, due to the disciplinary convention. But one could imagine that a male contributor (or a senior contributor) would reap greater rewards for these kinds of collaborations. It wouldn’t say much about the hypothesis if that were not the case, but if men received more advantage from papers with explicitly equal coauthors, that would certainly be consistent with the hypothesis that first-author naming conventions help women get credit.

Okay, maybe that’s a stretch. Sarsons closes by noting that she plans to expand the sociology sample and add disciplines with different authorship conventions. It will be challenging to tease out whether authorship conventions really help women get due credit for their work, and I’m skeptical that that’s 100% of the story. But even if it could fix part of the problem, what a simple solution to ensure credit where credit is due.

Written by epopp

January 11, 2016 at 1:47 pm

is economics less racially integrated than other disciplines?

A few days ago, economist Noah Smith posted this tweet:

This raises an interesting question: what is the racial balance of the economics profession and how does that compare with similar fields?

It helps to start with a baseline model. In higher education research, the common finding is that Blacks and Latinos are under represented among professors when compared to the population. Blacks and Latinos are each about 6% of the professoriate (e.g., see the National Center for Education Statistics summary here). Asians tend to be about 10% of the professoriate, which means they are over represented compared to the population. These numbers vary a little by rank, with lower ranks having more racial and ethnic minorities.

Finding the numbers for economics professors is tricky. You have to dig a little to find the data. In 2006, The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education counted 15 Black economists among 935 faculty in top 30 programs – a whopping 1.6%. There seem to be very few surveys of economists, but there is the 1995 Survey of Americans and Economists on the Economy conducted by the Washington Post and the Kaiser Family Foundation. That survey reports that .5% (<1%) of economics professors are Black, according to Bryan Caplan’s analysis of the data in the Journal of Law and Economics (Table 1, p. 398). The same article reports about 5% for Asian economists. This indicates that economics faculty are more likely to be White than the population as a whole and academia in general. If readers have access to more recent surveys of economists and their demographics, please use the comments.

Follow up question #1: Is economics similar to other related social science disciplines like political science or sociology? Answer: Political science has about 5% Black faculty and 3.4% Asian faculty according to this 2011 APSA report (Table 8, p. 40). Sociology has about 7% Black faculty and 5% Asian faculty according to this 2007 ASA report. So economics is more White than allied social science disciplines and about the same in terms of Asian faculty.

Follow up question #2: What about economics’ similarity to math intensive STEM fields like physics or math? According to a 2014 report from the American Institute for Physics, about 2% of physics faculty are Black and 14% are Asian (see Table 1). According to this 2006 study of the American mathematics faculty, 1% are Black and 12% Asian in the PhD programs (Table F5).

To summarize:

  • Economics professors are less likely to be Black (~1%) than professors as a whole (~6%).
  • Economics professors are less likely to be Black (~1%) than political scientists and sociologists (5%-7%).
  • Black professors are equally common in econ, math, and physics (1-2% for each field).
  • Asian economics professors are equally common as Asian professors in other social sciences (3.5% in political science, ~5% in economics and sociology).
  • Economics professors are less likely to be Asian (5%) than in academia as a whole (10%) and even less than physics and mathematics (14% and 12%)

Bottom line: Economics has fewer Black faculty when compared to social sciences and fewer Asian compared to physical sciences. That’s something that makes you go “hmmmm….

50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz ($2!!!!)/From Black Power/Party in the Street 

Written by fabiorojas

January 6, 2016 at 12:01 am

democracy is tougher than you think, wealthy ones at least

We often hear that democracy is under threat. But is that true? In 2005, Adam Przeworski wrote an article in Public Choice arguing that *wealthy* democracies are stable but poor ones are not. He starts with the following observation:

No democracy ever fell in a country with a per capita income higher than that of Argentina in 1975, $6055.1 This is a startling fact, given that throughout history about 70 democracies collapsed in poorer countries. In contrast, 35 democracies spent about 1000 years under more developed conditions and not one died.

Developed democracies survived wars, riots, scandals, economic and governmental crises, hell or high water. The probability that democracy survives increases monotonically in per capita income. Between 1951 and 1990, the probability that a democracy would die during any particular year in countries with per capita income under $1000 was 0.1636, which implies that their expected life was about 6 years. Between $1001 and 3000, this probability was 0.0561, for an expected duration of about 18 years. Between $3001 and 6055, the probability was 0.0216, which translates into about 46 years of expected life. And what happens above $6055 we already know: democracy lasts forever.

Wow.

How does one explain this pattern? Przeworski describes a model where elites offer income redistribution plans, people vote, and the elites decide to keep or ditch democracy. The model has a simple feature when you write it out: the wealthier the society, the more pro-democracy equilibria you get.

If true, this model has profound implications of political theory and public policy:

  1. Economic growth is the bulwark of democracy. Thus, if we really want democracy, we should encourage economic growth.
  2. Armed conflict probably does not help democracy. Why? Wars tend to destroy economic value and make your country poorer and that increase anti-democracy movements (e.g., Syria and Iraq).
  3. A lot of people tell you that we should be afraid of outsiders because they will threaten democracy. Not true, at least for wealthy democracies.

This article should be a classic!

50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz ($2!!!!)/From Black Power/Party in the Street 

Written by fabiorojas

January 4, 2016 at 3:34 am

free college vs. cost-benefit thinking

Last month, Howard Aldrich made—as he often does—a good point in the comments:

There’s been an interesting subtle shift in the rhetoric regarding whose responsibility it is to pay for an individual’s post-secondary education. My impression is that there was a strong consensus across the nation 50 years ago, and certainly into the late 1960s, that governments had a responsibility to educate their students that extended up through college. However, I perceive that consensus has been under attack from both the left and the right….Liberals argue that much of the public subsidy goes to the wealthier high income students whose parents don’t really deserve the subsidy. Conservatives argue that as students benefit substantially from their college education, they should pay most of the cost.

This month, I’ve been writing about the history of cost-benefit analysis. (Why yes, I do know how to have a good time.) On the surface, it has nothing to do with universities. But there are important links to be made.

One of the arguments I’m playing with is that economic thinking—here just meaning a rational, cost-benefit, systematic-weighing-of-alternative-choices sort of thinking—has been particularly constraining for the political left. On the right, when people’s values disagree with economic reasoning, they ignore the economics and forge ahead. On the left, while some will do the same, the “reasonable” position tends to be much more technocratic. Think Brookings versus Heritage. Over time, one thing that has pulled “the left” to the right has been the influence of a technocratic, cost-benefit strain of thought.

Yes, I know these are sweeping generalizations. But stay with me for a minute.

There are a couple of big economic arguments for asking individuals, not the public, to pay for higher education. Howard’s comment gets at both of them.

One is that while there is some public benefit in educating people, individuals capture most of the returns to higher education. If that is the case, it makes sense that they should pay for it, with the state perhaps making financing available for those who lack the means. Milton Friedman made this argument sixty years ago, and since then, it has become ever more popular.

The other is that providing free higher education is basically regressive. The wealthier you are, the more likely you are to attend college (check out this NYT interactive chart), and relatively few who are poor benefit. Milton Friedman made this argument, too, but it is particularly associated with a 1969 paper by Lee Hansen and Burton Weisbrod, and continues to be made by commentators across the political spectrum.

Both of these arguments have become economic common sense (even though support for the latter is actually pretty weak). Of course it’s fair for individuals to have to pay for the education that they benefit so much from. And of course it doesn’t make sense to pay for the education of the upper-middle class while the working poor who never make it to college get nothing.

Indeed, these arguments have been potent enough that it has become hard to argue for free higher education without sounding extreme and maybe economically illiterate. Really, it kind of amazes me that free college is even being talked about seriously these days by President Obama and Bernie Sanders.

But even the argument for free college now depends heavily on claims about economic payoff. The Obama proposal headlines “Return on Investment,” arguing that “every dollar invested in community college by federal, state and local governments means more than $25 [ed: !] in return.” The Sanders statement starts, “In a highly competitive global economy, we need the best-educated workforce in the world.” The candidate who is a self-described socialist relies on a utilitarian, economic argument to justify free higher education.

So what’s the problem with thinking about college in terms of economic costs and benefits? After all, it’s an expensive enterprise, and getting more so. Surely it doesn’t make sense to just wantonly spend without giving any thought to what you’re getting in return.

The problem is, if the argument you really want to make is that college is a government responsibility—that is, a right—starting with cost-benefit framing leads you down a slippery slope. Benefits are harder to measure than costs, and some benefits can’t be measured at all. All sorts of public spending becomes much harder to justify.

Now, this might be fine if you generally think that small government is good, or that the economic benefits of college are pretty much the ones that matter. But if you think it’s worth promoting college because it might help people become better citizens, or increases their quality of life in some difficult-to-measure way, or you just want to live in a society that provides broad access to education, well, too bad. You’ve already written that out of the equation.

If you really believe there are social benefits to making public higher education freely available, then cost-benefit arguments will always betray you. But rights, on the other hand, aren’t subject to cost-benefit tests. Only a moral argument that defends higher education as a right—as something to value because it improves the social fabric in literally immeasurable ways—can really work to defend real public higher education.

Seem too unrealistic? Think about high school. There’s no real reason that free college should be subject to a cost-benefit test when free high school is not. Individuals reap economic benefits—lots of them—from attending high school, too. And high school is at least as regressive as college: the well-off kids who attend the good public schools reap many more benefits than the low-income kids who attend the crummy ones. It only makes sense, then, that families should pay for high school themselves, right? Perhaps with government loans, if you’re too poor to afford it.

And yet no one is making this argument. Because we all still agree—at least for now—that children have the right to a free primary and secondary education. We may argue about how much to spend on it, or how to make it better, but the basic premise—governments have a responsibility to educate students, in Howard’s words—still holds.

So I support the free college movement. But I’d like to see its champions stop saying it’s because we need to be globally competitive, or because it’s got a huge ROI.

Instead, say it’s because our society will be stronger when more of us are better educated. Say that knowing higher education is an option, and an option you don’t have to mortgage your future for, will improve our quality of life. Say that colleges themselves will be better when they return to seeing students as students, and not as revenue streams.

Say it’s because it’s the right thing to do.

Written by epopp

October 23, 2015 at 12:00 pm

econ nobel prize cliches: collect them all

Every October when the Nobel prize in economics is announced, you hear the same trite and hackneyed things. Already, the Guardian has one of those tedious “economics is not a science” articles just to prepare for tomorrow. To help you save time, I’ve collected the following cliches so you can just clip and paste them into your tweets, Facebook messages, and blog posts:

  • Economics is not a science.
  • Actually, there is no Nobel Prize in economics.
  • The so-called Economics Nobel prize.
  • This prize refutes the policies of [insert politician you hate].
  • This prize supports the policies of [insert politician you love].
  • This prize is long overdue.
  • This prize rewards [my favorite field].
  • This prize rewards free-market fundamentalists.
  • This prize proves that free-market fundamentalists are wrong.
  • This person did not deserve the prize.
  • This person deserved the prize.
  • This is a rather mathematical/statistical prize for a technical point that I can’t summarize here.
  • This prize is for proving the obvious.
  • I predicted this all along.
  • I am completely surprised by this.
  • I can’t believe they gave this to a non-economist.
  • I can’t believe they gave this to a person not from [circle one: Harvard/MIT].
  • Harvard is slipping, straight to toilet.
  • Steve Levitt does/does not know the work of these prize winners.

Actually, I have a Granovetter post ready to go if he ever wins, since he is the sociologist whose work is most known in economics. Add your own cliches in the comments.

50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz ($2!!!!)/From Black Power/Party in the Street

Written by fabiorojas

October 12, 2015 at 1:41 am

Posted in economics, fabio

the bio-complexity challenge to economics

Economics is fun to criticize, but hard to replace. Everybody thinks they can do better. How many times have you read an article lampooning the rational actor model or slamming the efficient markets hypothesis? Well, another research group has appeared that tries to offer a replacement. From New Scientist:

Earlier this year, several dozen quiet radicals met in a boxy red building on the outskirts of Frankfurt, Germany, to plot just that. The stated aim of this Ernst Strüngmann Forum at the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies was to create “a new synthesis for economics”. But the most zealous of the participants – an unlikely alliance of economists, anthropologists, ecologists and evolutionary biologists – really do want to overthrow the old regime. They hope their ideas will mark the beginning of a new movement to rework economics using tools from more successful scientific disciplines.

Drill down, and it’s not difficult to see where mainstream “neoclassical” economics has gone wrong. Since the 19th century, economies have essentially been described with mathematical formulae. This elevated economics above most social sciences and allowed forecasting. But it comes at the price of ignoring the complexities of human beings and their interactions – the things that actually make economic systems tick.

 The problems start with Homo economicus, a species of fantasy beings who stand at the centre of orthodox economics. All members of H. economicus think rationally and act in their own self-interest at all times, never learning from or considering others.

The article then goes on to describe how they are building new set of models that have social rather than selfish actors. They are going to use models from biological theory to model large groups of economic agents.

More power to them, but here’s the deal with economics – it survives because it has a number of very strong features:

  • A basic micro-economics that makes sense (e.g., supply and demand curves, marginal utility etc)
  • Rational actor models are just short hand for “has goals, which can be selfish or altruistic.” My friend, rational does not mean what you think it means.
  • A good grasp of various statistical methods.
  • A good recipe for normal science (define utility functions, apply Langrangian, etc)

For an alternative economics to win, it needs to be so incredibly awesome that it overwhelms these very important features of existing economics. That is why various challengers, such as feminist economics or modern Austrian economics, are limited. They sometimes have valid criticisms, but they simply don’t do well when it comes to offering a real alternative. So, good luck, my biological friends, but don’t get lost in the weeds.

50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz ($2!!!!)/From Black Power/Party in the Street

Written by fabiorojas

July 30, 2015 at 12:01 am

Posted in biology, economics, fabio

picking the right metric: from college ratings to the cold war

Two years ago, President Obama announced a plan to create government ratings for colleges—in his words, “on who’s offering the best value so students and taxpayers get a bigger bang for their buck.”

The Department of Education was charged with developing such ratings, but they were quickly mired in controversy. What outcomes should be measured? Initial reports suggested that completion rates and graduates’ earnings would be key. But critics pointed to a variety of problems—ranging from the different missions of different types of colleges, to the difficulties of measuring incomes along a variety of career paths (how do you count the person pursuing a PhD five years after graduation?), to the reductionism of valuing college only by graduates’ incomes.

Well, as of yesterday, it looks like the ratings plan is being dropped. Or rather, it’s become a “college-rating system minus the ratings”, as the Chronicle put it. The new plan is to produce a “consumer-facing tool” where students can compare colleges on a variety of criteria, which will likely include data on net price, completion rates, earning outcomes, and percent Pell Grant recipients, among other metrics. In other words, it will look more like U-Multirank, a big European initiative that was similarly a response to the political difficulty of producing a single official ranking of universities.

A lot of political forces aligned to kill this plan, including Republicans (on grounds of federal mission creep), the for-profit college lobby, and most colleges and universities, which don’t want to see more centralized control.

But I’d like to point to another difficulty it struggled with—one that has been around for a really long time, and that shows up in a lot of different contexts: the criterion problem.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by epopp

June 26, 2015 at 1:48 pm

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