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three cheers for angela merkel

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It appears that Angela Merkel’s time as party head is coming to an end. But one thing that she deserves praise for is her strong position on migration. As the world continued to slam its door on ordinary folks who only seek safety and jobs, Merkel insisted that Germany allow refugees into the country.

The years ahead will be tough. No matter which party is in office, policy continues to drift in an anti-immigrant direction. This will not change any time soon. But still, people like Merkel show that it is not impossible to rely on common sense, insist that movement should be legal and that refugees, of all people, should be left alone.

Three cheers for Angela Merkel and three cheers for all those who defend the right of movement.

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The rise of Black Studies:  From Black Power to Black Studies 
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Written by fabiorojas

October 30, 2018 at 4:06 am

Posted in uncategorized

answering the “so what?” question: chuck tilly’s 2003 guide

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One of the perennial issues for novice and expert researchers alike is answering the “so what” question of why bother researching a particular phenomena.  In particular, sociologists must justify their places in a big-tent discipline, and orgheads swim in the murky expanse of interdisciplinary waters.  For such researchers, this question must be answered in presentations and publications, particularly in the contributions section.

While it’s easy for expert researchers to melt into a potentially crippling existential sweat about the fathomless unknown unknowns, novice researchers, unburdened by such knowledge, face a broader vista.  According to Chuck Tilly,* researchers need to decide whether to enter existing conversations, bridge two different conversations, initiate a new conversation, or…???**

Since I couldn’t remember Tilly’s exact quote about conversations despite hearing it at least twice during his famous Politics and Protest workshop (before at Columbia, now at the GC), I pinged CCNY colleague John Krinsky.

Krinsky responded to my inquiry by sharing this great questionnaire and chart of low/high risk/reward research: TillyQuestionnaire_2003.  This document offers helpful exercises for discerning possible contributions for research projects at all stages.

*For Krinksy’s (and others) tribute to Tilly’s mentorship and scholarship, go here.

** If anyone remembers Tilly’s exact quote about conversations, please share in the comments.

Written by katherinechen

October 24, 2018 at 3:16 pm

open borders conference this weekend + blogcation

I have a lot of stuff to do soon. I will be at the Open Borders conference in DC. So come to conference! Or, make a donation. It’s all good. I am also presenting at the American politics workshop at Indiana. And, of course, I am working on Fall Contexts which will be super A+ terrific.

So I will take a two week blog break. Peace out and enjoy the video.

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50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz ($4.44 – cheap!!!!)
A theory book you can understand!!! Theory for the Working Sociologist (discount code: ROJAS – 30% off!!)
The rise of Black Studies:  From Black Power to Black Studies 
Did Obama tank the antiwar movement? Party in the Street
Read Contexts Magazine– It’s Awesome!!!!

Written by fabiorojas

October 16, 2018 at 8:47 pm

Posted in uncategorized

cymande

++++++++

BUY THESE BOOKS!!
50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz ($4.44 – cheap!!!!)
A theory book you can understand!!! Theory for the Working Sociologist (discount code: ROJAS – 30% off!!)
The rise of Black Studies:  From Black Power to Black Studies 
Did Obama tank the antiwar movement? Party in the Street
Read Contexts Magazine– It’s Awesome!!!!

Written by fabiorojas

October 14, 2018 at 4:01 am

Posted in uncategorized

certification vs. personal growth as teaching goals

What should the goal of teaching be? From the teacher’s perspective, I see two major goals:

  • Certification: The goal is to assess what the student knows and signal it to an external audience (e.g., pass or “A”).
  • Personal growth: To help an individual improve in terms of acquiring knowledge or a skill.

The problem is that these goals are often in conflict. Let’s take a simple example. Let’s assume that I want to take a French class in college. Let’s assume that I am learning a fair amount of French. I can ask for the bathroom. I can say hello, I can even follow real world conversations. But then I don’t do so well on tests. My spelling is off and I can’t quite conjugate my verbs right. I have real problems memorizing vocabulary.

What grade should I get? There’s a real argument that I deserve an F. I haven’t met the standards of the class. But on the other hand, I’ve actually become sort of functional in French and I’ve genuinely improved myself. So maybe I should really get a B or C. There is no intrinsic right answer because it’s ultimately about values. Are college classes about self improvement or signalling expertise?

In my own teaching, I decided to vary the standard by class. If a class is needed to send strong signals, I tend to assign stricter grades. My introduction to sociology course is like this. Grades need to be tough because a lot of students don’t do the work and even among those that work, not everybody is getting the material. If a class is an elective or terminal (e.g., the end of a student’s educational career), I am really more focused on just helping the student become better in some skill set, like writing and public speaking, and the actual letter grade is more mellow, even if my assignments and tests are tough.

Share your teaching philosophy in the comments.

++++++++

BUY THESE BOOKS!!
50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz ($4.44 – cheap!!!!)
A theory book you can understand!!! Theory for the Working Sociologist (discount code: ROJAS – 30% off!!)
The rise of Black Studies:  From Black Power to Black Studies 
Did Obama tank the antiwar movement? Party in the Street
Read Contexts Magazine– It’s Awesome!!!!

Written by fabiorojas

October 12, 2018 at 4:20 am

Posted in uncategorized

what would happy sociology look like?

Sociology is in large part a “grievance discipline.” Open up our journals and you will find article after article on exclusion, racism, sexism, and inequality. It’s even to the point that some scholars are like, “Stop! We need to talk about other stuff!” And, I’ll be up front, I am part of the problem: I’m the author of work on AIDS, Black nationalism and the Iraq War.

Then, my good friend Victor Ray, sent out this tweet yesterday:

Yes, what would people read? Here is my response, we need a movement within sociology to become more balanced. As I’ve noted before, there are lots of great developments in modern society, but they get much less attention than negative events. What would “happy” sociology look like?

  • There would be a cultural sociology that asks about the cultural preconditions of the industrial revolution, the single event in human history that lifted the most people out of poverty.
  • There would be a similar cultural sociology examining the massive decline in inter-personal violence and war that has occurred over the last two or three hundred years.
  • There would be a cultural sociology examining the liberation of minorities, women, and LGBT people in many nations.
  • There would be an economic sociology that examines how modern economies support an insane level of cultural diversity.
  • There would be a sociology that explains how societies produce things that essentially wipe out many forms of infectious disease and drastically reduce child mortality.
  • There would be a cultural sociology that explains why individual freedom remains strong in a world with fascism, national socialism, communism, radical religious groups, and populist nationalism.

In other words, the typical sociology 100 class gives you a massive toolbox for describing inequality and oppression, but how can these tools be used to describe all the good parts of modern life?

Of course, some of this exists as research literature, but not as the staple of undergraduate, or even graduate, education. Show me that I’m wrong! Who is teaching this course? Inquiring minds want to know!

++++++++

BUY THESE BOOKS!!
50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz ($4.44 – cheap!!!!)
A theory book you can understand!!! Theory for the Working Sociologist (discount code: ROJAS – 30% off!!)
The rise of Black Studies:  From Black Power to Black Studies 
Did Obama tank the antiwar movement? Party in the Street
Read Contexts Magazine– It’s Awesome!

Written by fabiorojas

October 10, 2018 at 4:01 am

Posted in uncategorized

“organized creativity: approaching a phenomenon of uncertainty” spring school 2019 at Freie Universität Berlin, Germany – cfp due Oct. 15, 2018

banksy-instagram_creativedestructionauction

Photo credit: Banksy instagram

Are you researching a phenomena like this?

Are you looking for a trans-Atlantic research community to share your research on creativity?  Please download INTERNATIONALSPRINGSCHOOLOC_2019CALL.korr.  Or, read the copied and pasted cfp below:

Organized Creativity: Approaching a Phenomenon of Uncertainty 

INTERNATIONAL SPRING SCHOOL, MARCH 12-15, 2019, 

Freie Universität Berlin, Germany 

Call for Papers 

Creativity is one of the key concepts, yet among the most slippery ones of present-day Western societies. Today, the call for creativity spans far beyond typically “creative” fields and industries towards becoming a universal social norm. Creative processes, however, are fundamentally surrounded by uncertainty. It is difficult to know ex-ante what will become a creative idea and, due to its destructive force, it is also highly contested. This inherent uncertainty associated with creativity thus spills over to other social spheres, too. 

The DFG-funded Research Unit “Organized Creativity” is studying creative processes in music and pharmaceuticals – as representatives for creativity in the arts and in the sciences. The goal of the unit is to understand in greater depth those practices of inducing and coping with uncertainty which are employed by various actors involved in creative processes. 

Target Group 

The Spring School provides space for exchange between advanced doctoral students, early postdocs and several senior scholars that do research on creativity either in the context of innovation research or in the fields of business and management studies, economic geography, psychology or sociology. Combining lectures from renowned scholars (Prof. Dr. Dr. Karin Knorr Cetina, Prof. David Stark, Ph.D., Prof. Dr. Gernot Grabher, Prof. Dr. Elke Schüßler, Prof. Dr. Jörg Sydow) with the presentation, discussion and development of individual papers, this call invites advanced doctoral students and early postdocs from all disciplines concerned with creativity and uncertainty to join our discussion in Berlin. The working language will be English. 

Applications 

The deadline for applications is October 15, 2018. Applicants are requested to email a CV and a short essay (max. 2,000 words including references) to konstantin.hondros@uni-due.de. This short essay should summarize the research that is to be presented during the Spring School. Notification of acceptance is sent out no later than October 30, 2018. In case of acceptance, a revised longer paper – either an extended essay (max. 4,000 words) or a full paper (max. 8,000 words) – must be sent by January 15 2019 for distribution to discussants and workshop participants well in advance of the event. 

Formats 

Later-stage full papers are presented in Presentation Sessions (20 minutes for presentation, followed by 10 minutes for feedback from renowned scholars and 10 minutes for open discussion); earlier-stage work and short papers are discussed in Group Discussions consisting of three or four early scholars and two discussants (5 minutes for presentations followed by everyone at the round table, providing feedback based on their advance reading of the paper and for open discussion). 

Practical information 

There is a participation fee of € 100, but several grants for travel expenses will be available. The workshop will be held at the Department of Management of Freie Universität Berlin. We start our Spring School with a kick-off event on March 12 at 6 p.m., our closing discussion on March 15 will conclude the School at 1 p.m. 

For further information about the project ‘Organized Creativity’: 

https://blogs.fu-berlin.de/organized-creativity/ 

Written by katherinechen

October 8, 2018 at 8:47 am