orgtheory.net

inequality in the skies

I’m on a plane right now, flying from Sacramento back to Albany. And sitting here I’m reminded of how air travel itself reflects the growing inequality of society in a trivial, but suggestive, way.

Planes have always had first-class and passenger cabins, at least as far as I know. If the Titanic had this distinction, I’m guessing it was in place from the beginning of commercial aviation.

But for most of my adult life, planes—at least the ones I usually fly on, from one U.S. city to another—looked something like this:

plane 1

Just roughing it out here, this means that 7% of the passengers used about 15% of the room, with the other 93% using 85% of the cabin space. Such a plane would have a Gini index of about 8. (For reference, the U.S. Gini is about 48, and the global one is around 65.)

Domestic airlines have pretty much moved to a three-tier system now, in which the traditional first-class seating is supplemented by “Economy Plus,” in which you get an extra three or four inches of legroom over the standard “Economy” seats. I, as usual, am crammed into what should really be called “Sardine Class”—where seats now commonly provide a pitch of 31”, a few inches down from what most planes had a decade ago.

plane 2

(The only time I’ve ever sprung for Economy Plus was on the way back from ASA Vegas, when for some reason I had to fly to San Francisco in order to take a red-eye back to Albany. It cost about $60 for me to actually be able to sleep most of the 5 ½ hours, and in that case it was totally worth it.)

Anyway, in today’s standard U.S. domestic configuration, the 12% of people in first class use about 25% of the passenger space, the 51 people in Economy Plus use another 30%, leaving the sardines—the other 157 people—with 45%. That gives us a Gini index of about 16.

Transatlantic flights, however, are increasingly taking this in-the-air distinction to new heights (ha ha). Take, for example, the below United configuration of the Boeing 777. It boasts seats that turn into beds on which one can lie fully horizontal. (Makes Economy Plus look like it’s for chumps!) United calls this new section of bed-seats “BusinessFirst.”

plane 3

Unsurprisingly, though, these air-beds take up even more space than a nice comfy first class seat. So if we look again at how the space is distributed, we now have 21% of the people using about 40% of the plane, 27% using another 20%, and the final 52% using the last 40%. The Gini index has now increased, to 25.

Of course, I’m fully aware that a very small proportion of the Earth’s population can afford airline tickets in the first place, so we’re really seeing growing inequality between the 10%, the 1%, and the 0.1%. (I assume the 0.01% have jet shares?)

Nevertheless, it’s not often you see such a clear visual representation of our collective acceptance of the right of a small fraction of people to consume a very disproportionate percentage of resources. I wonder how much of the shift is actually driven by increased inequality, as opposed to improved capacity for price discrimination?

And it’s also worth noting that the plane above, while unequal relative to the old-fashioned three-rows-of-first-class-and-the-rest-economy layout, is still nowhere near the inequality of the U.S., or the world.

(No vouching for the accuracy of the calculations above — very back-of-the-envelope, and I’m tired!)

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Written by epopp

November 24, 2014 at 1:30 pm

Posted in inequality

101 Responses

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  1. Elizabeth, thanks for this insightful and interesting analysis. For any graphic artists out there, it would be a very interesting visualization of inequality if you could push this a step further to illustrate what an airplane layout might look like if it had a Gini coefficient matching that of the US (or of the world)

    Liked by 4 people

    Adam K

    November 24, 2014 at 2:14 pm

  2. My understanding is that it is (at least partially) a result of airline deregulation. Inequality in the sky was lower 30 years ago because everyone on the plane was either part of the 1% of 0.1% because flying was so expensive. Airline couldn’t compete on price so they competed on amenities. As deregulation brought more competition, it also brought lower prices (Ticket prices have dropped by ~15% since mid-1990s alone). Now the 10% can afford to fly but airline can also afford to engage in more price discrimination so we end up with the 0.1% in first class, the 1% in economy plus, and the 10% in economy.

    Liked by 7 people

    Josh Mccabe

    November 24, 2014 at 3:16 pm

  3. @JoshMcCabe. Not to push the analogy too far, but deregulation may have had a thing or two to do with rising income inequality in the US as well…

    Liked by 3 people

    krippendorf

    November 24, 2014 at 7:12 pm

  4. the fact that you were flying wasn’t reminder enough of growing inequality?

    Liked by 3 people

    gradstudent

    November 24, 2014 at 8:20 pm

  5. @JoshMcCabe, that makes sense. @gradstudent, well, yes, hence my point about the top 10%. And @AdamK, I wouldn’t deign to call it graphic design, and obviously there’s many ways to reach a particular Gini, but here’s the US, more or less: https://orgtheory.files.wordpress.com/2014/11/picture2.png

    I think those are waterbeds in the front. California King waterbeds.

    Liked by 1 person

    epopp

    November 25, 2014 at 1:30 am

  6. Thanks for that striking visualisation, which provides an intriguing counterpoint to slave ship packing diagrams: http://www.bl.uk/learning/timeline/large106661.html

    Inequality is indeed rife, but let’s look on the bright side: as an ‘economy’ passenger your contribution to the rapid growth in global per capita carbon emissions from air travel remains disproportionate (as you say, most the world’s population are non-flyers), but it’s still massively lower than that of that of your more pampered fellow-passengers. This imbalance is exacerbated by the tendency for wealthier individuals to take to the air more frequently and to take longer flights – with or without their waterbeds(!). A fine example of how social institutions can be constructed in ways that promote socially inequitable and environmentally unsustainable outcomes.

    Liked by 3 people

    RichardB

    November 25, 2014 at 11:42 am

  7. @epopp, that qualifies for the moniker of graphic design! And I think this is where they keep the water beds:
    http://www.bustle.com/articles/42439-derek-lows-18000-singapore-airlines-suite-is-insane-photos

    Liked by 1 person

    Adam K

    November 25, 2014 at 3:20 pm

  8. Speaking of income inequality, did anyone hear or watch NPR’s Intelligence Squared debate on the motion, “Income Inequality Impairs the American Dream of Upward Mobility”?

    Liked by 2 people

    chrismartin76

    November 25, 2014 at 5:13 pm

  9. Reblogged this on Perspectivas da vida.

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    mr_pandit

    November 27, 2014 at 5:44 pm

  10. Reblogged this on siddharthj1991.

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    siddharthj1991

    November 27, 2014 at 6:05 pm

  11. What an interesting comparison!

    Liked by 1 person

    amommasview

    November 27, 2014 at 6:05 pm

  12. Reblogged this on Encure.US and commented:
    An excellent analysis of inequality in the skies!

    Like

    encure

    November 27, 2014 at 6:58 pm

  13. Cool

    Like

    brokensbooks

    November 27, 2014 at 7:18 pm

  14. Nice

    Like

    brokensbooks

    November 27, 2014 at 7:19 pm

  15. Beth, the issue becomes even more interesting if you look at the PRICE of the tickets. A quick check on the American Airlines website found $949 coach tickets to SFO from RDU next June, and $3439 first class tickets. But for a real shock: $1930 coach tickets to LHR but $8901 business class [not even first class!} fares!
    So, I suppose we could infer that the elite’s share of airplane space reflects, to some extent, the prices they pay.
    But, I am led to ask: how much do you have to make to afford these prices? “Wealthy individuals” is an understatement!

    Liked by 1 person

    Howard Aldrich

    November 27, 2014 at 7:33 pm

  16. Wouldn’t the elite be flying on private jets?

    Like

    chrismartin76

    November 27, 2014 at 7:36 pm

  17. Prior to the mid 40s, all scheduled flights on certificated carriers were 1st class flights. Responding to the unscheduled airlines (mostly operating war surplus DC3s and 6s) challenge, the certificated carriers started offering tourist/excursion class seats. By 1953-4, most flights were configured 50/50. I suspect there are some folks who pay full fare for first and business-first seats, but most go to frequent-flyers. The last time I flew business-first from Seattle to Europe, the upgrade cost 15K miles and $400.

    Liked by 2 people

    Fred Thompson

    November 27, 2014 at 10:04 pm

  18. Inequality is bad

    Liked by 1 person

    literaturegradstudent

    November 27, 2014 at 10:11 pm

  19. Very interesting numbers! Never realised the classes above Economy took up almost half of the space – I would have guessed 35% at best.

    I enjoyed your writing, it would be interesting to get some feedback from you. I am trying to get better at blogging, writing and analysing so if you are interested here is the link:
    https://ebusinesstudent.wordpress.com/

    Liked by 1 person

    ebusinesstudent

    November 27, 2014 at 10:37 pm

  20. Reblogged this on hannah●victoria●lauren .

    Liked by 1 person

    hannah victoria lauren

    November 27, 2014 at 10:45 pm

  21. I think the fact we have the capacity to post a blog on the internet whilst flying through the air is pretty amazing and makes everyone on the plane pretty privileged. I realise that you acknowledge that just being on the plane puts you into a privileged position, but just thought I’d add that this makes it even more so! Interesting thoughts, and I agree on the reflection it provides on some parts of society.

    Liked by 1 person

    The Last Half Stone

    November 27, 2014 at 11:32 pm

  22. @The_Last_Half_Stone: TBH I’m too cheap to spring for the internet…I wrote it on the plane, but posted it when I got home!

    Liked by 3 people

    epopp

    November 27, 2014 at 11:35 pm

  23. We usually settle for business class for long flights and join the other sardines for the shorter ones. I can afford the first class but it seems such a waste of funds.

    Liked by 2 people

    Asariels Muse

    November 27, 2014 at 11:35 pm

  24. Haha, good plan! It still amazes me American planes have the internet, I don’t understand how they do that – I have never been on a plane in UK with the internet, paid or not. I have also sat in Bryant Park NY on free wifi while sunbathing – you can’t do that anywhere here!

    Liked by 3 people

    The Last Half Stone

    November 27, 2014 at 11:49 pm

  25. In India and Asia, the sardine class is called ‘Cattle Class’.

    Liked by 2 people

    Right Off Center

    November 28, 2014 at 1:49 am

  26. So are you saying there is an injustice going on here that someone needs to change or just making an observation? The price for that extra space is quite high so don’t see this as a representation of the separation of the classes in the same way as see income inequality. These space differences are a way to market to different incomes. They don’t perpetuate those differences in my opinion. The increase in space for 1st class tells me our 1st class riders have increased expectations and perhaps this shows more how more arrogant they are getting. But beyond that, I’m guessing I’m not seeing this the same way you are. Interesting info but totally not surprising to me in one bit.

    Liked by 4 people

    TechChucker

    November 28, 2014 at 2:33 am

  27. You get what you pay for. If you want the cheapest seats because it’s not worth it to you to spend more money to be more comfortable, you have that option, and, you don’t have to buy internet access either (as you didn’t).

    However, if you have the money, you can buy a potentially more pleasant flight by buying more space and marginally better service and crappy internet access if you like.

    What throws a wrench in mapping this onto class stratification is that not all of the people sitting in business and first class payed the full price of those tickets, they used miles to upgrade to those seats. I routinely fly in those seats using mileage accrued by flying a lot. And, I get free economy plus seats on United because I fly enough so that loyalty gives me a small perk. It’s not a class or money thing, I fly for work and use at least some of my mileage to upgrade on longer flights.

    The other wrench in a direct mapping onto income inequality is that increased comfort (what you pay for when you buy the more expensive seats) means different things to different people. If I were extremely tall I’d be forced to buy seats with more legroom (economy plus/exit rows or, gulp, business). Again, not a class or money issue but a personal comfort issue.

    Liked by 2 people

    rwanderman

    November 28, 2014 at 3:24 am

  28. Reblogged this on david.john and commented:
    The Journey, whatever you want to call it, from Sacramento to Albany or From the Economy Class to Business First or From the …… to …….

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Awesome this is what i was looking for
    https://expertalby.wordpress.com/

    Liked by 1 person

    albinthomaz

    November 28, 2014 at 8:19 am

  30. Strikingly (and sadly) interesting….

    Liked by 1 person

    fennabee

    November 28, 2014 at 8:51 am

  31. Reblogged this on Mechanical Engineering Explained.

    Liked by 1 person

    Cheetah

    November 28, 2014 at 9:22 am

  32. Inequality expresses itself in many ways, but the main point is always the same. Some people have more than us, and it is at our expense. What our economic system does is to try to put us into fitting categories in order to sell us goods showing our economic status. Or do we really need to lie in a plane, knowing that all the space could be used better? And do we have to buy a house with 18 bathrooms? Sooner or later, this type of behavior will stop being glorified, and will be considered rather a value disorder.

    Liked by 2 people

    Frank B.

    November 28, 2014 at 10:40 am

  33. Reblogged this on The Cruise People, Ltd. (Canada) and commented:
    Interesting observation. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

    cruise2

    November 28, 2014 at 10:47 am

  34. Cutting in the other direction, the largest US domestic carrier (by number of passengers flown) is Southwest, which has no such distinctions. Thus, if you look at domestic air travel as a whole, it can be said to be moving in the direction of being more egalitarian, not less. As in almost everything, its how you look at the numbers

    Liked by 3 people

    dknights

    November 28, 2014 at 2:10 pm

  35. Reblogged this on SMALLTOWNGIRLBIGTIMELIFE.

    Liked by 1 person

    smalltowngirlbigtimelife

    November 28, 2014 at 3:02 pm

  36. Awesome .this is what i was looking for..
    http://expertalby.wordpress.com

    Liked by 1 person

    albinthomaz

    November 28, 2014 at 3:38 pm

  37. @Adam K, *here’s* graphic design: http://kieranhealy.org/blog/archives/2014/11/27/fly-air-gini/

    Though it still doesn’t quite capture all the touches of the Singapore Airlines suite.

    Liked by 3 people

    epopp

    November 28, 2014 at 3:48 pm

  38. I made a quick check – EasyJet has exclusively single-class configuration (according to http://www.seatmaestro.com/airplanes-seat-maps/easyjet-airbus-a320.html). So perhaps its also a lot about which company you fly with.

    Liked by 1 person

    Michael

    November 28, 2014 at 7:15 pm

  39. Reblogged this on hem888.

    Liked by 1 person

    hem888

    November 28, 2014 at 7:19 pm

  40. Reblogged this on alexande0lamprey.

    Liked by 1 person

    alexande0lamprey

    November 28, 2014 at 7:23 pm

  41. Interesting. I love Virgin America cheap first class tickets, they are only about 10 percent more.

    Liked by 2 people

    alenjramos

    November 28, 2014 at 8:15 pm

  42. Man, I can remember the days of being asked by the stewardess (as they called themselves back then) whether or not I was comfortable taking on the responsibility of sitting in the luxurious front seat with several extra feet of leg room next to the emergency exit.

    Was I comfortable with it? “Hell, yeah.”

    Comfort was kind of the point. Those days are long gone. My next flight will be on a private jet, case closed.

    Liked by 1 person

    allthoughtswork

    November 28, 2014 at 8:38 pm

  43. At the front of the plane is another blogger in first class blogging about how unfair it is that his expensive ticket pays for the people in the back of the plane to travel much cheaper than they would otherwise have to.

    And so it goes.

    (as Vonnegurt would say)

    Imagine a line of traffic stopped at the traffic lights. At the front you have a Ferrari, then a Porsche, then a few brand spanking new SUV’s then some moderately priced sedans, then a few second hand ones, then some beaten up pickup trucks at the back. Each car owner has made a purchasing decision based on their own individual needs, wants and personal finances.

    Is this unfair? Should the owners of Porsches be forced to let the owners of pickup trucks ride in the backseat (assuming there even is a backseat)? Or should they be forced to sell their Porsches and give some of the money to the owners of pickup trucks so they can both ride about in moderately expensive cars?

    Anyway ….. along comes a welder who welds the line of cars together into one long vehicle and then attaches some wings to them.

    Et voila! :)

    Liked by 2 people

    curiosetta

    November 28, 2014 at 8:44 pm

  44. Reblogged this on SocioTech'nowledge.

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    Pedro Calado

    November 28, 2014 at 10:03 pm

  45. I LOVE that, Frank B: “Value disorder” is going to catch on. Mark YOUR words!

    Liked by 1 person

    Sally Ember, Ed.D.

    November 28, 2014 at 11:03 pm

  46. This one made me laugh. Thanks!

    Like

    Sally Ember, Ed.D.

    November 28, 2014 at 11:04 pm

  47. genius.

    Like

    HigherEdGenius

    November 29, 2014 at 3:43 am

  48. Reblogged this on The Round Trip Ticket.

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    Namrata Suri

    November 29, 2014 at 3:43 am

  49. Great content. Now I know :D

    Do visit my blog guys!

    Like

    Fahmi Latif

    November 29, 2014 at 4:32 am

  50. Interesting !

    Liked by 1 person

    Hammad

    November 29, 2014 at 5:39 am

  51. FOR GaLBAIN!

    Like

    foglitelion

    November 29, 2014 at 8:23 am

  52. Reblogged this on Lost in the Darkness.

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    Francess Ibanez

    November 29, 2014 at 9:12 am

  53. Reblogged this on 911wazobia and commented:
    Lol…. fears

    Like

    911wazobia

    November 29, 2014 at 9:26 am

  54. Reblogged this on LIBERTY FOR AFRICA..

    Like

    versatilejohn

    November 29, 2014 at 11:17 am

  55. 31 inches? Our flight will have 29!

    Like

    Valent Lau

    November 29, 2014 at 12:23 pm

  56. Reblogged this on The EndPoint Business Blog and commented:
    The worse part of travel is being stuck in cattle class and this post brings the inequality of it all to light. Never thought about it in this manner but sure felt it each time I had to make my way through first class and business class to the cramped seats behind. Doesn’t help that I suffer from claustrophobia. Apart from this, I love travel and often feel the need to get away.

    Like

    shantiepc

    November 29, 2014 at 1:55 pm

  57. I guess you could say the pilots have all the luxurious legroom they could ever want, and we have no control over who’s piloting the plane we’re crammed on.

    Like

    synapticrevolt

    November 29, 2014 at 2:59 pm

  58. The way I see it the people at the front are paying big bucks for the privilige and probably subsidising those in the rear of the plane a little.

    Like

    James R Clark

    November 29, 2014 at 4:26 pm

  59. Great post!

    HempHausMag.com

    Like

    hemphaus

    November 29, 2014 at 9:14 pm

  60. Interesting read, but I beg to differ. Airlines are putting these flat beds because this is what the market wants, and economy tickets aren’t getting more expensive, even though the flat beds are eating up their space. Actually, they’re getting cheaper and cheaper.

    Liked by 1 person

    awtytravels

    November 29, 2014 at 9:16 pm

  61. Okay im guilty i guess im that teen sitting in business/first class on every plane ride. But those beds r totally worth the struggle like they’re so comfy. Trust.

    Like

    rimzii99

    November 29, 2014 at 9:53 pm

  62. I, for one, welcome the inequality on a plane, because if everyone had exactly the same seat and had to pay exactly the same, the ticket prices for the cheapest seats would go up by 50%-100%. So I look at those people in the comfy 1st class chairs while passing through to my row and I think “Suckers! You’ve just paid for my return ticket!”. I could probably afford 1st class occasionally – but I won’t, since I can get a whole vacation with coach airfare for the price of a first class ticket. And anyway, my cramped back row seat will land at our shared destination the same exact second as the poshest first class will.
    Now if the inequality in the skies were about some people consistently getting better seats than everyone for the same price as everyone else, just for the fact of belonging to a privileged family or religion or race, that would be a cause for concern.

    Like

    List of X

    November 30, 2014 at 12:44 am

  63. Brilliant. This would be a great lesson for lower-level corporate apparatchiks, that they are lumped in with the rest of us.

    Like

    Michael Walker

    November 30, 2014 at 1:45 am

  64. Love it. How can we eliminate the growing baggage fees. I thought it was because gas prices were high 2-3 years ago. I would hope that should have gone down with the price today….

    Like

    MYDOCVU

    November 30, 2014 at 3:13 am

  65. Reblogged this on I'm Pink Cherry Princess.

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    Pink Cherry Princess

    November 30, 2014 at 6:31 am

  66. I really enjoyed this. Well written and accurate.
    The greatest power we all have is our spending.
    The airlines changes simply reflect what people are willing to spend. The 95pct could rapidly change all this we just refuse to sacrifice. The 1pct get rich off our selfishness and laziness to use the one thing they are powerless to counter.. Our spending. The war machine needs taxes, earn less, the food is unhealthy, eat organic, not fake organic labels but truly farm grown local produce, do not buy or consume products that feed their greed. Everyone ready? Within days of seeing no profits these massive entities would do anything to have you back as profits drive them not emotions. We are not helpless we are all in their unlocked cage willingly so what good is all this class inequality talk? Do something.

    Like

    onefastdaddy

    November 30, 2014 at 12:03 pm

  67. Reblogged this on the Peripatetic Acupunk.

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    flannelpj

    November 30, 2014 at 1:24 pm

  68. Reblogged this on An Alchemist's Journey…..

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    BCHQ

    November 30, 2014 at 3:33 pm

  69. Usually first class is double the cost so 7% of the passengers pay 15 % of the wages of the staff, the fuel, taxes, levies, mortguage and space and get 15 % of the space. Seems immensely equitable to me. If I want to spend the cash I can buy what I want. It means I have that much less to spend on Starbucks, phone apps, sports jerseys, designer jeans and sneakers. We all make choices and use money as a marker. Get over it.

    Liked by 1 person

    W. Clark Boutwell

    December 1, 2014 at 3:16 am

  70. Reblogged this on Outland Exile:Book One of Old Men and Infidels and commented:
    Usually first class is double the cost so 7% of the passengers pay 15 % of the wages of the staff, the fuel, taxes, levies, mortguage and space and get 15 % of the space. Seems immensely equitable to me. If I want to spend the cash I can buy what I want. It means I have that much less to spend on Starbucks, phone apps, sports jerseys, designer jeans and sneakers. We all make choices and use money as a marker. Get over it.

    Like

    W. Clark Boutwell

    December 1, 2014 at 3:17 am

  71. Reblogged this on mistafancy.

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    mistafancy

    December 1, 2014 at 3:53 am

  72. Reblogged this on bwgequalsgray and commented:
    Why I hate flying

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    rellbg09

    December 1, 2014 at 4:15 am

  73. Hi, nice to see your post.. I like your post. Follow me: http://wp.me/p5llxD-q

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    konveksi di jakarta 2015

    December 1, 2014 at 7:25 am

  74. Reblogged this on lalithanatarajan.

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    lalitha18

    December 1, 2014 at 8:01 am

  75. Reblogged this on Vivamboma.

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    Bendel

    December 1, 2014 at 9:37 am

  76. Yes, the 0.01% do have shares in private aircraft — but they complain just as often (and as loudly) as their fellow air travelers seated in Sardine. These folks have an entire aircraft to themselves, and fill it with their offspring, pets, and golf equipment. What they frequently fail to grasp is that their extra-special mode of transportation is still subject to the same rules as ye olde 747 — that is to say, forces of gravity and nature can and will delay or cancel your flight just the same. My husband (the pilot of these chauffered-towncar-equivilent planes) remains ever amused at the exceptionalism focus they have, but has yet to concede to fly in a blizzard. He also sits in a cockpit with approximately the same amount of legroom as Sardine class, so there you are.

    Liked by 1 person

    Cay

    December 1, 2014 at 3:00 pm

  77. Pial

    December 2, 2014 at 9:16 am

  78. […] at the OrgTheory.net blog and Crooked Timber, sociologists Beth Berman and Kieran Healy spin a couple of neat fantasias about […]

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  79. […] The LA Times has an article expanding on Elizabeth’s post on airline inequality: […]

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  80. […] and the poor is no secret, most of us probably don’t know just how disturbingly wide the gap is. OrgTheory recently had an interesting post on how society’s income disparity is reflected on plane seating. […]

    Like

  81. I enjoyed your writing, but it struck me as if I was listing to a child at the dinner table complain that a sibling was getting a bigger slice of pie and therefore was unthankful about their slice. I am a smaller size guy and therefor can usually be comfortable in economy class. But if I were six foot five, I think I would want to pay for an upgrade. An older person with back problems might want to spring for an upgrade while a twenty something cannot relate to the problem or the need. There are many reasons other than gluttony to want the opportunity to have choices to be comfortable other than one size fits all. Before those darn Write brothers came along we had no choice in the air at all, how unfair.

    Like

    CJ

    December 3, 2014 at 3:12 am

  82. I liked the original article but also second CJ’s opinion. To add my two cents: if we only had coach seats available, then we would all have to ask “is this as good as it gets?” Also- the bed seats are new- so expensive. But look at it another way: if the seats to butts ratio is increasing, then that is a positive sign that we are moving away from the current scheme of uncomfortable seating. So they will need more planes, bigger planes, or something similar to compensate. And eventually- prices will decrease.

    Like

    M.K. Wyman

    December 3, 2014 at 11:49 am

  83. nicee :D

    Like

    jovan29milic

    December 4, 2014 at 1:25 pm

  84. […] Beth Berman, a sociologist during SUNY Albany, passing a wearied impulse on a flight, motionless to calculate a Gini index for newcomer planes. The Gini fellow is a approach to magnitude a statistical placement of income. The aloft a index, a some-more unsymmetrical a society. After a some discerning back-of-the-fag-packet maths, Ms Berman worked out that: […]

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  85. […] Beth Berman, a sociologist at SUNY Albany, passing a bored moment on a flight, decided to calculate the Gini index for passenger planes. The Gini coefficient is a way to measure the statistical distribution of income. The higher the index, the more unequal the society. After a some quick back-of-the-fag-packet maths, Ms Berman worked out that: […]

    Like

  86. […] Beth Berman, a sociologist at SUNY Albany, passing a bored moment on a flight, decided to calculate the Gini index for passenger planes. The Gini coefficient is a way to measure the statistical distribution of income. The higher the index, the more unequal the society. After a some quick back-of-the-fag-packet maths, Ms Berman worked out that: […]

    Like

  87. […] Beth Berman, a sociologist at SUNY Albany, passing a bored moment on a flight, decided to calculate the Gini index for passenger planes. The Gini coefficient is a way to measure the statistical distribution of income. The higher the index, the more unequal the society. After a some quick back-of-the-fag-packet maths, Ms Berman worked out that: […]

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  88. Reblogged this on Fairlight's Life.

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    fairlightslife

    December 5, 2014 at 8:06 pm

  89. Reblogged this on WHISTLING BEAUTIFUL and commented:
    This is the truth

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    lolaoseni2092014

    December 5, 2014 at 8:47 pm

  90. […] Beth Berman, a sociologist during SUNY Albany, passing a wearied impulse on a flight, motionless to calculate a Gini index for newcomer planes. The Gini fellow is a approach to magnitude a statistical placement of income. The aloft a index, a some-more unsymmetrical a society. After some discerning back-of-the-fag-packet maths, Ms Berman worked out that: […]

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  91. […] Beth Berman, a sociologist during SUNY Albany, passing a wearied impulse on a flight, motionless to calculate a Gini index for newcomer planes. The Gini fellow is a approach to magnitude a statistical placement of income. The aloft a index, a some-more unsymmetrical a society. After some discerning back-of-the-fag-packet maths, Ms Berman worked out that: […]

    Like

  92. Reblogged this on randomransoms's Blog.

    Like

    randomransoms

    December 6, 2014 at 11:24 pm

  93. Reblogged this on Tech at Peak.

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    Deepu patil

    December 7, 2014 at 4:04 pm

  94. I don’t see how the airline industry is to blame for this. However, from a capitalistic perspective—it is clear as to why they would model or adopt the inequality and division that exist in our society.

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    ackfastblog

    December 7, 2014 at 7:27 pm

  95. […] Beth Berman, a sociologist at SUNY Albany, passing a bored moment on a flight, decided to calculate the Gini index for passenger planes. The Gini coefficient is a way to measure the statistical distribution of income. The higher the index, the more unequal the society. After some quick back-of-the-fag-packet maths, Ms Berman worked out that: […]

    Like

  96. This is a great article! i know that now in United flights they even have a Global First Class (which are basically cocoons) before Business First. I was wondering if i would be able to translate this article, while obviously giving you credit, and post it on my blog?

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    Deborah Braga

    December 9, 2014 at 5:01 pm

  97. I dream of the good ol days in the 80s and early 90s when even economy had reasonably space and for whatever reason, unexpected upgrades magically happened!

    Now even as a ‘gold’ frequent flyer of a not particularly great Indian airline, ‘bump ups’ never randomly occur, their coupons for upgrades don’t work as you have to buy the ‘regular’ fare which is as much as ‘sale’ business class… so one attempts to survive squished sardine class where a 5’7″ woman ends up with bruised knees along with the migraine from incessant squalling infants! My partner is 6′ so anything other than an aisle seat is near impossible to manage.

    However a friend in the airline industry once explained to an economy passenger pissed off at waiting 2 mins as the business class passengers bus pulled away to transport them to the terminal… “Did you enjoy your meal? Partake of any of the beverage service? And what about having toilet paper in the washrooms?” Whaat? “Please thank the folks who paid for it – those who just left – as your airfare and that of all who flew economy didn’t even cover the cost of fuelling the plane let alone the salary of those of us who had the pleasure of serving you.” Hmm… it is a wonder he still has his job even if there was a kernel of truth!

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    Every Day Adventures in Asia

    December 12, 2014 at 7:02 am


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