orgtheory.net

trump symposium ii: the organizational basis of today’s crazy politics – a guest post by josh pacewicz

with one comment

This guest post on Trump’s run for president is written by Josh Pacewicz, a political sociologist at Brown University. 

+++++

In case you haven’t noticed, this has been a crazy election cycle. On both the Democratic and Republican side, a candidate who is more extreme than the typical serious presidential contender went all the way to the convention. Trump, who espouses some positions that are not recognizably Republican, is arguably even more the anomaly than Sanders. But both fared well, which suggests that the contours of America’s 20th Century party system are strained, if not cracked. How did this happen?

2016 makes sense only in the historical context of the gradual polarization of American political parties, or the tendency of politicians from the two parties to vote differently on every issue. Party polarization is distinct from other trends like a rightward drift among both Republicans and Democrats and is visible in, for instance, analyses of congressional voting, which show no Republican with a voting record left of any Democrat. A political status quo based in complete disagreement is a necessary precondition of this election, because only then do political observers expect politicians to treat their opponents as unredeemable out-there radicals, a state of affairs that creates opportunities for candidates who truly are outside the political mainstream. Because partisan polarization is a decades-long trend, explanations of 2016 that focus on factors like the recession or racial resentment over Obama’s presidency seem incomplete. Since the 1980s, party polarization has increased in good economic times and bad, during periods of war and peace, and under Democratic and Republican administrations.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by fabiorojas

August 31, 2016 at 12:39 am

trump, social solidarity, and the performance of politics: a guest post by tim gill

with 2 comments

Tim Gill is a CIPR fellow at Tulane University. His research addresses political sociology and globalization. This guest post addresses the candidacy of Donald Trump.

++++++

In May, I taught my final course at the University of Georgia as I finished up my dissertation: a three-week long seminar on political sociology. Before the course, I was certain that Trump would be the most sought after topic of discussion by the students, regardless of what topic we broached. The Great Depression and issues of tariffs? Trump. The civil rights movement and Black Lives Matter? Trump. And, finally, how performances matter within US politics? Well, of course, Trump.

I admit. When I teach political sociology and use books and articles concerning US politics, my head tends to wander back to Venezuela, where I do most of my research. This didn’t happen though nearly as monolithically this summer. Along with the students, my thoughts also redirected themselves towards Trump, his recurrently outlandish policy positions, and bigoted comments. After each new comment, we would think this surely would be the end of the campaign. As we found out, it wasn’t. And it somehow hasn’t been, even as the absurdities have persisted.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by fabiorojas

August 30, 2016 at 12:01 am

trump symposium week

with 4 comments

This week, we’ll have a few posts about the candidacy of Donald Trump. It will have three parts:

  1. Tom Gill will post on Trump as a political performer.
  2. Then, Josh Pacewicz will dig into Trump’s poll numbers.
  3. We’ll wrap up with a post by me on Trump, where I’ll add some of my own thoughts.

I’ll focus on the following points. Interested readers should send me questions:

  1. How predictable/unpredictable was the Trump candidacy?
  2. Using the Entertainment Theory of the GOP to understand Trump’s nomination and likely November loss.
  3. Using Trump to explain when social science theories do/do not work.

What do you want to know about Trump? Use the comments or send me email.

50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz ($2!!!!)/From Black Power/Party in the Street

Written by fabiorojas

August 29, 2016 at 12:01 am

has twitter killed blogs?

with 2 comments

Fabio has written about this a bit already, but it’s worth thinking about how sociology on the internet parallels this larger story about blogs as distinctive showcases of writers’ voices to  to the greater immediacy of twitter alongside the ubiquity of “blogs” on many different kinds of websites. In the New Republic, Jeet Heer argues blogging was a victim of its own success, though it’s interesting to consider how this tracks onto the decreased importance of blogging within sociology, which seems to me a much more straightforward story of technological change (folks shifted from blogging to social media).

To judge by Read’s account, both Gawker and blogging were victims of their own success, albeit in very different ways. Gawker got big enough to earn a frighteningly powerful enemy, a relentless and unforgiving man who deployed his vast resources and the legal system to crush the publication. Blogging got so popular that it caught the attention of the mainstream media, which bought up the best talent, and of Silicon Valley, which recast the writer’s medium from an intimate platform that was all about voice to a social network all about clicks and shares. Banks are lucky enough to be too big to fail; Gawker and blogging were too big to succeed.

Written by jeffguhin

August 28, 2016 at 6:17 pm

Posted in uncategorized

having olympics withdrawal? we’re here to help

leave a comment »

From “The Breaking Winds Bassoon Quartet.”
50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: 
Grad Skool Rulz ($2!!!!)/From Black Power/Party in the Street

Written by fabiorojas

August 28, 2016 at 12:01 am

blogcation august 2016/ASA line up

with 2 comments

Org theory people are just coming home from the Academy of Management meetings and sociologists are about to leave for the American Sociological Association meetings. I am also trying to wrap up a really, really, really ridiculously cool project that I am so going to tell you about. So we’re taking a break here till next week. But, boy, do we have some good stuff coming up:

  • A mini-symposium on the sociology of Trump: Tim Gill from Tulane will write about political performance and Josh Pacewicz from Brown will approach the Trump candidacy from the perspective of class politics.
  • Catching up on books: The Inner Lives of Markets by Ray Fishman and Tim Sullivan; Anthony Ocampo’s The Latinos of Asia; and The Second Machine Age by Brynjolfsson and McAfee.
  • Article discussion of “Racism and Discrimination” by Nancy DiTomaso
  • My response to Pamela Oliver’s post on mass incarceration. Hint: Don’t wait. Read it now.

Also, if you are at the ASA, please drop by and say hello. I would love to meet you. I’ll be at the following events:

See you after ASA!

50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz ($2!!!!)/From Black Power/Party in the Street

Written by fabiorojas

August 15, 2016 at 6:15 pm

Posted in uncategorized

black lives matter moves to cultural nationalism: analysis and forecast

Let’s start with a quiz. Guess which policy demands are from the Black Lives Matter platform and which ones are from the original 10-point plan from the Black Panthers in 1966:

  1. We believe that this racist government has robbed us, and now we are demanding the overdue debt of forty acres and two mules.
  2. An end to the privatization of education and real community control by parents, students and community members of schools including democratic school boards and community control of curriculum, hiring, firing and discipline policies.
  3. We believe in an educational system that will give to our people a knowledge of self. If a man does not have knowledge of himself and his position in society and the world, then he has little chance to relate to anything else
  4. We believe we can end police brutality in our Black community by organizing Black self-defense groups that are dedicated to defending our Black community from racist police oppression and brutality.
  5. A reallocation of funds at the federal, state and local level from policing and incarceration [specific programs omitted] to long-term safety strategies such as education, local restorative justice services, and employment programs.
  6. Institute a universal single payer healthcare system. To do this all private insurers must be banned from the healthcare market as their only effect on the health of patients is to take money away from doctors, nurses and hospitals preventing them from doing their jobs and hand that money to wall st. investors.
  7. Racial and gender equal rights amendment.

Answer: BLM – 2, 5; BP – 1, 3, 4. Trick question: 6 & 7 are actually from a list of Occupy Wall Street demands. If you got some wrong, don’t worry. A lot of these demands are interchangeable and all three groups have promoted some version of most of them.

The purpose of the quiz is to illustrate how the recent Black Lives Matter platform draws heavily from Black cultural nationalism and progressivism. It also shows that the Black Lives Matter movement is now evolving in a direction very similar to these groups. Like the Panthers in 1966, Black Lives was founded specifically in response to police repression. But it framed itself in Marxist terms and soon expanded to offer social programs. Similarly, Black Lives Matter started in response to police shootings and has now offered a fairly comprehensive list of demands rooted in the Left.

There are differences of course, but I think we can now articulate a framework, or baseline, for thinking about BLM. It is a progressive, community oriented movement, not a movement that primarily focuses on police reform. It is also a movement that will have wide appeal on the Left, but less appeal to the middle and the Right.

Since we’ve had a number of movements like this, we can look at their history. We’ve had the Panthers in the 1960s, the anti-globalization movement of the 1990s, and the Occupy movement of 2010s. These movements tend to be brief, but intense. They have wide cultural impact, but limited policy or electoral impact. The impact of BLM will be very concentrated in a few places and otherwise widespread and diffuse. Time will tell if the comparison with BLMs ancestry is an adequate guide to their future.

50+ chapters of grad skool advice goodness: Grad Skool Rulz ($2!!!!)/From Black Power/Party in the Street 

Written by fabiorojas

August 11, 2016 at 12:01 am

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,974 other followers